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Chicago-Area Woman Killed While Crossing the Street

A tragic vehicle accident occurred in Forest Park on Tuesday. According to the Forest Park Review, a thirty-nine year old University of Chicago teacher had parked her car on Madison Street near the intersection of Elgin Avenue. She was on her way to Starbucks in the morning before work as part of her daily routine. The woman got out of her parked car and proceeded across the street to Starbucks. She did not use a crosswalk, but instead attempted to quickly get across the road from the middle of the stretch of street.

Several cars were stopped in the middle of the road in backed up rush hour traffic at the location where the woman was crossing the street. She walked between those cars which were at a stand-still. However, as she was crossing, another car had moved into the wrong lane in an effort to get past the backed up traffic and make a left turn. The turning vehicle ultimately struck the woman as she was crossing.

The victim was talking and communicating as emergency personnel arrived. But she died in the emergency room about an hour after the accident.

The circumstances leading up this deadly accident is something to which we can all relate. Everyone has watched as others have attempted to get across traffic without using the intersection. We have also all watched (and perhaps ourselves been guilty) of temporarily moving into the wrong lane in an effort to skip ahead of stopped traffic and move into the turning lane. However, both of these actions are extremely risky. It takes only one mistake, on the part of either the driver or the pedestrian, to lead to death and destruction. That risk is simply too high.

Our Chicago car accident attorneys at Levin & Perconti encourage everyone to recognize their own traveling behaviors that are too risky and work hard to eliminate them. The consequences of these car accidents destroy lives-the lives of those involved as well as that of their friends and family. Please work hard to spare the suffering and correct risky driving and walking behavior.