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Salt Build-Up May Have Caused Recent Chicago Train Accidents

Last week we reported on a pair of cars that crashed into an immobile freight train when emergency lights failed to function.

The two car crashes occurred on opposite sides of a crossing on the 9000 block of South Halsted Street, early in the morning, around 3 am. The train was headed eastbound in the night. The conductor noticed that the emergency lights and gates were not working. The lack of lights meant that the black train was almost invisible to the approaching cars.

The train was forced to stop before it completely crossed the tracks because another train was stalled in front of it. It was at that moment that the crashes occur. A southbound car crashed into the side of the stopped tanker first, following shortly after by a northbound vehicle. Four people were injured in the pair of Chicago train accidents. Three of them are currently listed in critical condition.

The Chicago Tribune is now reporting that, following investigations into these Chicago car accidents, officials now know that the emergency lights were disabled because of a buildup of road salt interfered with the electric circuitry running the device. Neighborhood residents dispute that claim, however. They assert that there have been problems with the lights for the past few weeks, before heavy salt was used following recent snow.

Our Chicago car crash lawyers at Levin & Perconti remain saddened to hear news of these train accidents. The need to abide by traffic signs is especially demanding when approaching trains, because the failure to take care at those areas almost always involves deadly collisions. However, that is impossible when malfunctions at the site make the emergency signs inactive. See Our Related Blog Posts:Chicago Train Crash Critically Injures Unsuspecting DriversElderly Woman Lucky To Escape Before Car Hit By Train