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NHTSA Hosting Data Modernization Session to NASS

The good folks over at the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration are always working hard to keep us safe on the road. Every year the United States’ various regulatory agencies launch campaigns to educate drivers on a few of the many different hazards that come with operating a motor vehicle, as well as ways that we can improve our driving experience. On July 18th the NHTSA will be hosting a public session on data modernization to do just that, and the topic of discussion is the National Automotive Sampling System (NASS).

The NASS was designed in the 1970’s, and is in desperate need of updating. With the rapid advancement of technology in the last few decades, the data needs of the transportation community have also significantly increased, and this has led the United States Congress to request improvements to the current system. Last year, the House and Senate provided $25 million to the NHTSA for the project, and now it is finally picking up steam.

Specifically, this modernization effort is aimed at addressing five needs:
• Need for a larger sample sizes for research • A need to expand the scope of data collection to include large trucks, motorcycles, and pedestrians
• The need for more data from pre-crash, crash, and post-crash phases in automobile collisions.
• Need to review what elements of crash data will be collected in the future
• A need to solicit input from suppliers, automakers, safety advocates, the medical community, and other research organizations

This data modernization is just one instance in a long line of innovations from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration and this one is being launched under the name “the Data Modernization Project.” As is the case in the implementation of all NHTSA policies, these public sessions will give drivers a chance to voice their opinion on pertinent issues, and will give them a say in what is added, removed, and changed in relation to current NASS data policies. Listening sessions will be on July 18th 2013 from 1-5p.m., but if you want to participate you can do so by pre-registering at the NHTSA website by July 11th.

The NHTSA says that their public session will be essential in establishing “information technology infrastructures, updating and prioritizing data collection, reselecting the sample sites and sample sizes, re-examining the electronic formats in which the crash data files are made available to the public, and improving data collection methods and quality control procedures, among other activities.” If you are interested in the issues, our lawyers would like to remind you to make sure your voice is heard. Motor vehicle accidents affect a huge amount of people, and every voice is beneficial. (National Highway Traffic Safety Administration)