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I-55 Car Accident Causes Large Fuel Spill

Car accidents can occur virtually anywhere, from parking lots to freeways. Most of the time the damage from these events occurs instantly from the physical impact on the vehicles. Protection from the physical jolt and collision is what most safety experts protect against in vehicle manufacturing. It is for that same reason that seat-belt laws swept the country, requiring all drivers and passengers to be strapped into the car to limit harm following an impact.

However, a much less common, but still deadly risk occurs following these accidents, in the moments when those involved let their guard down. Cars are complicated, heavy machinery that include countless heavy movable parts and combustible substances. When these machines are torn and smashed in an accident, the after-effects can never be fully known. Most dangerously, fuel spillage after a crash has the potential to seep far away from the initial site and ignite. The potential damage from a fire after the accident is high.

For example, the Lincoln Courier published a story today on an Illinois car accident that struck I-55 on Thursday. A twenty year old driver attempted to change from the right lane to the left while on the highway. However, she misjudged the lane change and hit the end of a trailer, bounced off a guardrail and then smashed into the truck yet again. The semi’s gas tank ruptured during the incident, spilling nearly 130 gallons of diesel fuel onto the roadway and into a creek below.

Fortunately, rescue crews, including hazardous material teams, were able to arrive on the scene quickly enough to keep all onlookers away from the dangerous location while clean-up was underway. No further injuries were reported.

The lesson to be learned from this crash and similar accidents is that the scene of any car wreck may pose many hidden dangers. As our Chicago car accident attorneys at Levin & Perconti know, extreme care should be taken at all time at or near these scenes to protect against lurking risks.